Can food safety policy-making be both scientifically and democratically legitimated? If so, how?

Millstone, Erik (2007) Can food safety policy-making be both scientifically and democratically legitimated? If so, how? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, 20 (5). pp. 483-508. ISSN 1187-7863

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Abstract

This paper provides an analysis of the evolution of thinking and talking about the role of scientific knowledge and expertise in food safety policy-making, and in risk policy-making more generally from the late 19th century to the present day. It highlights the defining characteristics of several models that have been used to represent and interpret the relations between policy-makers and expert scientific advisors and between scientific and political considerations. Both conceptual and empirical strengths and weaknesses of those models are identified, focusing in particular on the ways in which they deal with scientific uncertainties and social choices. By drawing on both empirical evidence and conceptual analysis, a novel and more realistic model is provided along with an account of some conditions for food safety policy-making achieving both scientific and democratic legitimacy

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of models developed for establishing the role of scientific knowledge in food safety policy-making since the late 19th century. It goes on to suggest replacing these models with a co-evolutionary model, drawing on the author¿s extensive experience in many facets of the field.
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Depositing User: Erik Millstone
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 18:38
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2012 07:50
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/17510
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