Pharmaceuticals, the state and the global harmonisation process

Abraham, John (2004) Pharmaceuticals, the state and the global harmonisation process. Australian Health Review, 28 (2). pp. 150-160. ISSN 01565788

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Abstract

This article examines how regulatory agencies' mission to protect and promote public health, enshrined in legislation, has been shaped and limited by commitments to the commercial interests of the pharmaceutical industry. It is argued that the regulatory state has become largely a 'competition state' which considers its primary role to be the maintenance of industry's competitive position in world markets. By examining regulatory developments across the EU, Japan and the US, I shall explain how the competition state became a building block for the global harmonisation process. To legitimise the global harmonisation process in terms of their mission to protect and promote public health, regulators claim that it does not lower safety standards and will accelerate the availability of pharmaceutical innovations to patients who need them. However, evidence is presented to suggest that these legitimising claims are not tenable.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Sociology
Depositing User: John Abraham
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 18:36
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2012 11:08
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/17383
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