The role of spatial and surface cues in the age-processing of unfamiliar faces

George, Patricia A and Hole, Graham J (2000) The role of spatial and surface cues in the age-processing of unfamiliar faces. Visual Cognition, 7 (4). pp. 485-510. ISSN 13506285

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Abstract

Two experiments investigated the importance of spatial and surface cues in the age-processing of unfamiliar faces aged between one and 80 years. Three manipulations known to affect face recognition were used, individually and in various combinations: inversion, negation, and blurring. Faces were presented either in whole or in part. Age-estimation performance was largely unaffected by most of these manipulations; age-processing appears to be a highly robust process, due to the numerous cues available. Experiment 1 showed that, in contrast to face recognition, age-perception appears to be substantially unimpaired by inversion or negation. Experiment 2 suggests that age-estimates can be made on the basis of either surface information (the 2D disposition of the internal facial features, together with texture information) or shape information (head-shape plus feature configuration, as long as shape-from-shading information is present).

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Co-main author
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Graham Hole
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:51
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2012 12:02
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14759
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