The impact of thin models in music videos on adolescent girls' body dissatisfaction

Bell, Beth T, Lawton, Rebecca and Dittmar, Helga (2007) The impact of thin models in music videos on adolescent girls' body dissatisfaction. Body Image, 4 (2). pp. 137-145. ISSN 1740-1445

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Abstract

Music videos are a particularly influential, new form of mass media for adolescents, which include the depiction of scantily clad female models whose bodies epitomise the ultra-thin sociocultural ideal for young women. The present study is the first exposure experiment that examines the impact of thin models in music videos on the body dissatisfaction of 16–19-year-old adolescent girls (n = 87). First, participants completed measures of positive and negative affect, body image, and self-esteem. Under the guise of a memory experiment, they then either watched three music videos, listened to three songs (from the videos), or learned a list of words. Affect and body image were assessed afterwards. In contrast to the music listening and word-learning conditions, girls who watched the music videos reported significantly elevated scores on an adaptation of the Body Image States Scale after exposure, indicating increased body dissatisfaction. Self-esteem was not found to be a significant moderator of this relationship. Implications and future research are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Beth Bell
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:49
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2017 13:36
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14586
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