Developmental aspects of consciousness: How much of a theory of mind do you need to be consciously aware?

Perner, Josef and Dienes, Zoltán (2003) Developmental aspects of consciousness: How much of a theory of mind do you need to be consciously aware? Consciousness and Cognition, 12 (1). pp. 63-82.

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Abstract

When do children become consciously aware of events in the world? Five possible strategies are considered for their usefulness in determining the age in question. Three of these strategies ask when children show signs of engaging in activities for which conscious awareness seems necessary in adults (verbal communication, executive control, explicit memory), and two of the strategies consider when children have the ability to have the minimal form of higher-order thought necessary for access consciousness and phenomenal consciousness, respectively. The tentative answer to the guiding question is that children become consciously aware between 12 and 15 months (+/-3 months).

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Zoltan Dienes
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:40
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2012 13:36
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13880
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