Detection versus sustained attention to drug cues have dissociable roles in mediating drug seeking behavior.

Hogarth, Lee, Dickinson, Anthony and Duka, Theodora (2009) Detection versus sustained attention to drug cues have dissociable roles in mediating drug seeking behavior. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 17 (1). pp. 21-30. ISSN 1064-1297

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Abstract

It is commonly thought that attentional bias for drug cues plays an important role in motivating human drug-seeking behavior. To assess this claim, two groups of smokers were trained in a discrimination task in which a tobacco-seeking response was rewarded only in the presence of 1 particular stimulus (the S+). The key manipulation was that whereas 1 group could control the duration of S+ presentation, for the second group, this duration was fixed. The results showed that the fixed-duration group acquired a sustained attentional bias to the S+ over training, indexed by greater dwell time and fixation count, which emerged in parallel with the control exerted by the S+ over tobacco-seeking behavior. By contrast, the controllable-duration group acquired no sustained attentional bias for S+ and instead used efficient detection of the S+ to achieve a comparable level of control over tobacco seeking. These data suggest that detection and sustained attention to drug cues have dissociable roles in enabling drug cues to motivate drug-seeking behavior, which has implications for attentional retraining as a treatment for addiction.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Dora Duka
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:40
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2012 11:11
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13818
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