Relationship between insight, cognitive function, social function and symptomatology in schizophrenia: the West London first episode study

Mutsatsa, Stanley H, Joyce, Eileen M, Hutton, Sam B and Barnes, Thomas R E (2006) Relationship between insight, cognitive function, social function and symptomatology in schizophrenia: the West London first episode study. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 256 (6). pp. 356-363. ISSN 0940-1334

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the nature and clinical correlates of insight in first-episode schizophrenia, and how these differ from findings in established schizophrenia. METHOD: Insight (and insight dimensions), clinical symptoms, neurocognitive function and social function were assessed in 94 patients with first-episode schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder according to DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: Greater global insight was associated with more severe depression. Poor overall insight was associated significantly with more severe negative and disorganisation symptoms as well as poor working memory, and at a trend level with lower current IQ. Patients with poor insight perceived themselves to have a better level of independent performance at daily living activities. CONCLUSION: In first-episode psychosis, the clinical correlates of poor insight are similar to those reported for established schizophrenia. Those patients with greater insight may be at risk of depression. The complex relationships between insight, positive and negative symptoms, neurocognitive dysfunction and social function may reflect the multidimensional nature of insight.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Samuel Hutton
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:37
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2012 09:27
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13558
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