Identity motives and ingroup favouritism: A new approach to individual differences in intergroup discrimination.

Vignoles, Vivian and Moncaster, Natalie (2007) Identity motives and ingroup favouritism: A new approach to individual differences in intergroup discrimination. British Journal of Social Psychology, 46 (1). pp. 91-113. ISSN 0144-6665

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Abstract

Theories suggest that identity motives for self-esteem, meaning, distinctiveness, and belonging are implicated in intergroup discrimination. Experimental studies have supported predictions, but correlational tests have been hindered by methodological problems. Using a new approach to measuring identity motives, we compared predictions of individual differences in ingroup favouritism. Seventy British adults completed measures of identity motives, British identification, and positive and negative trait typicality ratings of British and German nationalities. With greater identification, the strength of motives for distinctiveness and belonging increasingly predicted ingroup favouritism: consistent with optimal distinctiveness theory, the belonging motive predicted positive ratings of the national ingroup, whereas the distinctiveness motive predicted negative ratings of the national outgroup. Results show the value of disentangling measures of motive strength from measures of motive satisfaction.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: First author
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Vivian Vignoles
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:34
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2012 11:28
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13284
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