Acculturation Preferences of Majority and Minority Adolescents in Germany in the the context of society and family

Pfafferott, Inga and Brown, Rupert (2006) Acculturation Preferences of Majority and Minority Adolescents in Germany in the the context of society and family. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 30 (6). pp. 703-717. ISSN 0147-1767

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Abstract

Four hundred and fifteen adolescents (134 German majority and 281 minority members) completed a questionnaire which measured attitudes towards acculturation, life satisfaction and intergroup relation variables. German majority members preferred integration followed by assimilation (according to Berry's taxonomy), while minority members had a clear preference for integration. Integration was more strongly associated with favourable intergroup relations and, in the case of minority members, life satisfaction, than the other acculturation orientations. Furthermore the study showed that discrepancies between own acculturation attitudes and perceived attitudes of the other group may influence life satisfaction and intergroup attitudes. Perceived acculturation preferences of the respondents parents were also examined. German majority adolescents perceived their parents attitudes as more favourable to exclusion than their own, and minority members perceived their parents attitudes as leaning more towards separation than their own. In the majority sample, these discrepancies were not related to any of the outcome variables, but in the minority sample they influenced life satisfaction, perceived quality of intergroup relations, and tolerance.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Rupert Brown
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:33
Last Modified: 27 Apr 2012 09:42
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13209
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