Understanding the impact of mortality-related health-risk information: A terror management theory perspective

Jessop, Donna, Albery, Ian P, Rutter, Jean and Garrod, Heather (2008) Understanding the impact of mortality-related health-risk information: A terror management theory perspective. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34 (7). pp. 951-964. ISSN 0146-1672

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Abstract

Four studies explored the effects of providing mortality-related health-risk information from a terror management theory perspective. Study 1 (N = 48) revealed that exposure to information about the mortality-related risks of driving made mortality salient for young male drivers. Studies 2 (N = 60) and 3 (N = 139) demonstrated that young male drivers who perceived driving (fast) to be beneficial for self-esteem reported higher intentions to take driving risks (Study 2) and drive fast (Study 3) after exposure to such information compared to controls. Study 3 further demonstrated that the inclusion of a prime to behave responsibly eliminated this effect. Study 4 (N = 92) revealed that exposure to this prime alongside the mortality-related information generated increased accessibility of responsibility-related constructs and reduced accessibility of mortality-related constructs among young male drivers. The implications of these findings for terror management theory are discussed

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Donna Jessop
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:32
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2013 11:35
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13160
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