At the point at which you can do something about it, then it becomes more relevant’: Informed consent in the pharmacogenetic clinic

Hedgecoe, Adam (2005) At the point at which you can do something about it, then it becomes more relevant’: Informed consent in the pharmacogenetic clinic. Social Science and Medicine, 61 (6). pp. 1201-1210. ISSN 0277-9536

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Sociological investigation of informed consent has generated rich and complex descriptions of the clinical encounter, often challenging the straightforward picture painted by medical ethicists. This paper builds on this work, drawing on ideas from the Sociology of Science and Technology, to explore informed consent issues surrounding the use of the drug Herceptin, widely cited as an example of a novel approach to drug development called pharmacogenetics. Drawing on qualitative semi-structured interviews with 25 UK-based breast cancer specialists, this paper explores Herceptin's disputed epistemological status, as an example of pharmacogenetics or as something out of the ordinary in terms of clinical practice. It considers how, in turn, this impacts on the way in which informed consent is sought and influenced by clinicians’ desire to protect patients from possibly distressing test results. It highlights the flexible, contingent and context dependent nature of informed consent in the clinical setting.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > Anthropology
School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Sociology
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Depositing User: Chris Keene
Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2008
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2012 08:47
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/1311
Google Scholar:14 Citations
📧 Request an update