The tragedy of liberal diplomacy: democratization, intervention, statebuilding (part I)

Jahn, Beate (2007) The tragedy of liberal diplomacy: democratization, intervention, statebuilding (part I). Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, 1 (1). pp. 87-106. ISSN 1750 2977

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Since the end of the Cold War, democracy promotion, intervention and statebuilding have once again been explicit features of American foreign policy. Current assessments of this return, however, overlook both their longer term history and their roots in liberal (and not just American) ideology. The contradictions and dynamics entailed in the liberal philosophy of history have already played themselves out once before, in the modernization theories and policies of the early Cold War period. Despite their academic and political failures at the time, the same assumptions now underpin democracy promotion in the post-Cold War period and show signs of the same dynamics of failure. In this two part essay, I argue that the repetition of such counterproductive policies constitutes a recurring ‘tragedy of liberal diplomacy’ in which the shaping of US foreign policy by assumptions deeply rooted in the liberal philosophy of history plays a central part in producing the very enemies that policy is designed to confront and transform.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: democratization, intervention, liberalism, Locke, modernization policies, modernization theory, statebuilding
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > International Relations
Depositing User: Beate Jahn
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:25
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2012 08:18
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/12337
📧 Request an update