Colonial settlers and the metropole: racial discourse in the early 19th-century Cape Colony, Australia and New Zealand

Lester, Alan (2002) Colonial settlers and the metropole: racial discourse in the early 19th-century Cape Colony, Australia and New Zealand. Landscape Research, 27 (1). pp. 39-49. ISSN 0142-6397

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Abstract

The ways that British settlers in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, particularly those engaged in the extension of commercial sheep farming, constructed a certain discourse of colonialism during the first half of the 19th century are discussed. It is argued that this discourse was formulated, at least in part, in opposition to that of humanitarians within each colony and in Britain, who challenged settler capitalist practices on the fringes of Britain's expanding empire. Representations of a civilizing impact on the landscape were one component of the new racialized understandings and identities that settlers at each site constructed in their defence. Through attention to three colonial sites and their relations with each other and with the metropole, it is aimed to highlight the ways in which discourses of colonial landscapes and their inhabitants travelled across an imperial terrain.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > Geography
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General) > G0001 Geography (General)
Depositing User: Alan Lester
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:17
Last Modified: 12 Sep 2012 15:38
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/11506
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